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You are here: Home -> Preparing for Pregnancy -> Changes during Pregnancy Today: Sunday, August 20
Pregnancy Topics
Preparing for Pregnancy
When to See Your Doctor
Costs of Having a Baby
Changes during Pregnancy
Nutrition before Pregnancy
Exercise before Pregnancy
Your Prepregnancy Health
Chronic Illnesses and Pregnancy
Should I Consider Genetic Counseling?
Pregnancy After 35 Years of Age
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Substance Use During Pregnancy
Working before Pregnancy
Health and Medical Concerns
Pregnancy Tests
Medications and Treatments
Nutrition and Exercise
Fatigue, Work and Pregnancy
More than One Baby!
Changes in Your Baby
Changes in You
Your Pregnancy Partner
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Substance Use and Abuse
Single Mother-to-Be
Problems in Pregnancy
Labor and Delivery
After Your Baby's Birth
Your New Baby
Feeding Your Baby

Changes during Pregnancy

Your body goes through incredible changes during pregnancy! Your breasts enlarge, and the number of milk ducts to produce breast milk increases. Your organs are crowded by your enlarging uterus, which may cause more-frequent urination, heartburn or indigestion. Your legs, feet and hands may swell. Your hair and skin often undergo changes.

How Pregnancy Occurs

During your menstrual cycle, your body prepares for the possibility of pregnancy. An egg is released from one of your ovaries, and changes take place in the lining of your uterus to provide an environment for the development of a fertilized egg. If fertilization does not take place, the enriched lining is discarded through the menstrual flow.
Fertilization is believed to occur in the middle part of the Fallopian tube, not inside the uterus. Sperm travel through the uterine cavity and out into the tube to meet the egg that comes from the ovary.
After fertilization, the fertilized egg begins to divide and to grow. Within 3 to 7 days, it travels down the Fallopian tube into the uterus and attaches to the wall of the uterus. The developing baby is now called an embryo. (After 8 weeks it is called a fetus.)
By about day 12, the amniotic sac begins to form around the developing embryo. The sac contains fluid in which the baby can move around easily. Amniotic fluid also cushions the fetus against injury and regulates temperature.

Your Current Contraception Methods

Most doctors recommend staying off the Pill for two or three normal menstrual cycles before trying to get pregnant. Use some other form of contraception, such as the barrier method (condom), until you want to get pregnant.
The best and easiest time to remove an intrauterine device (IUD) is during your period. Wait for a couple of normal cycles after your IUD is removed before trying to conceive. Use a barrier contraceptive during the waiting time.
If you use the Norplant® implant for birth control, wait at least two or three menstrual cycles after it is removed before trying to get pregnant.
The Depo-provera® injection works for 3 months. I'd advise you to have at least two normal periods before you attempt a pregnancy.
Preparing for Pregnancy Articles:
When to See Your Doctor | Costs of Having a Baby | Changes during Pregnancy | Nutrition before Pregnancy | Exercise before Pregnancy | Your Prepregnancy Health | Chronic Illnesses and Pregnancy | Should I Consider Genetic Counseling? | Pregnancy After 35 Years of Age | Sexually Transmitted Diseases | Substance Use During Pregnancy | Working before Pregnancy
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