Your Online Pregnancy Help Make PregnancySurvey.com Your Home Page!
Search For:
Example: Pregnancy Morning Sickness
Home Page Pregnancy Calendar Questions and Answers Due Date Calculator Ovulation Calendar About Us Contact Us Site Map
You are here: Home -> Health and Medical Concerns -> High and Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy Today: Sunday, April 30
Pregnancy Topics
Preparing for Pregnancy
Health and Medical Concerns
Choosing Your Healthcare Provider
What is Prenatal Care?
Pregnancy Morning Sickness
How Your Health Affects Your Growing Baby
Environmental Poisons and Pollutants
Pregnancy Precautions
Special Concerns During Pregnancy
Anemia During Pregnancy
Other Medical Concerns
Hemorrhoids During Pregnancy
Heartburn During Pregnancy
Headaches During Pregnancy
Nasal Stuffiness During Pregnancy
Diabetes During Pregnancy
Epilepsy During Pregnancy
Asthma During Pregnancy
Cancer During Pregnancy
Risk of Down Syndrome During Pregnancy
Hepatitis During Pregnancy
Lupus During Pregnancy
Diarrhea During Pregnancy
(Rh-Factor) Rhesus factor in Pregnancy
High and Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy
Cervix During Pregnancy
Leg Cramps During Pregnancy
Fever During Pregnancy
Rubella During Pregnancy
Chickenpox During Pregnancy
Pregnancy Tests
Medications and Treatments
Nutrition and Exercise
Fatigue, Work and Pregnancy
More than One Baby!
Changes in Your Baby
Changes in You
Your Pregnancy Partner
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Substance Use and Abuse
Single Mother-to-Be
Problems in Pregnancy
Labor and Delivery
After Your Baby's Birth
Your New Baby
Feeding Your Baby

High and Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy

Your Blood Pressure

It's normal for your blood pressure to change a little during pregnancy. It often decreases a little during the second trimester of pregnancy and increases toward the end of pregnancy.
If you have high blood pressure, resting in bed on your side can help. If your blood pressure is still too high, you may need medications to lower it.

Low Blood Pressure

There are two causes of hypotension (low blood pressure) in pregnancy. It can be caused by the enlarging uterus putting pressure on large blood vessels, such as your aorta and vena cava. This is called supine hypotension and may happen when you lie down. It can be alleviated or prevented by not sleeping or lying on your back.
The second cause is called postural hypotension. When you rise rapidly from a sitting, kneeling or squatting position, gravity causes blood to leave your brain. This may result in a drop in blood pressure. Avoid postural hypotension by getting up slowly from a sitting or lying position.
I'm dizzy a lot. Should I worry?
(Click to get answer)
Blood-sugar problems can cause dizziness. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can make you feel dizzy or faint. Many doctors routinely test pregnant women during their pregnancies for problems with blood sugar.
If you have a problem with blood sugar, eat a balanced diet, don't skip meals and don't go a long time without eating. Many do better with eating 4 or 5 smaller meals a day, rather than 3 larger meals. If the condition is more serious, you may need to see a dietitian.

Pregnancy-Induced High Blood Pressure

Pregnancy-induced hypertension is high blood pressure that occurs only during pregnancy. It disappears after the baby is born. It develops in about 3% of women under age 40, and in 10% of women over 40.
This condition is treated by resting in bed on your side, by drinking lots of fluid and by avoiding salt and foods containing large amounts of sodium. Medications to lower blood pressure may be prescribed.
Health and Medical Concerns Articles:
Choosing Your Healthcare Provider | Diabetes During Pregnancy | What is Prenatal Care? | Pregnancy Morning Sickness | How Your Health Affects Your Growing Baby | Diarrhea During Pregnancy | Lupus During Pregnancy | Hepatitis During Pregnancy | Environmental Poisons and Pollutants | Epilepsy During Pregnancy | Asthma During Pregnancy | Cancer During Pregnancy | Pregnancy Precautions | Special Concerns During Pregnancy | High and Low Blood Pressure in Pregnancy | Anemia During Pregnancy | Other Medical Concerns | Risk of Down Syndrome During Pregnancy | (Rh-Factor) Rhesus factor in Pregnancy | Hemorrhoids During Pregnancy | Heartburn During Pregnancy | Headaches During Pregnancy | Nasal Stuffiness During Pregnancy | Cervix During Pregnancy | Leg Cramps During Pregnancy | Fever During Pregnancy | Rubella During Pregnancy | Chickenpox During Pregnancy
Pregnancy Calendar
Subscribe to Pregnancy Newsletter and receive new and popular pregnancy articles every week.
Your Email Address:
Pregnancy Calendar | Questions and Answers | Pregnancy Glossary | Suggest an Article | Link to Us | Contact Us | Site Map
Please note: All pregnancy articles on this website is for educational and information purposes only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and
treatment, you should consult your personal doctor.
Copyright © 2007, PregnancySurvey.com. All Rights Reserved | Privacy Statement
eXTReMe Tracker